What to do if you don’t feel you’re getting value for money at university

With the tuition fees cap about to be raised and many students already paying £9,000 a year to go to university, the stakes in higher education are much higher than they used to be. As a result of the enormous financial investment that is now involved in getting a degree, there is an increased focus on the quality of the teaching and whether courses are delivering in terms of results and value for money. Many universities are now bracing themselves for complaints, not just about the courses but the facilities – such as accommodation – too. But what can students really do if they don’t feel that their chosen degree has delivered value for money? Degrees vs. goods and services It’s worth remembering that what students pay for isn’t the degree itself. There’s no guarantee that anyone will walk out of university with the degree that they’re hoping for and no amount of cash spent will (or should) change that. What’s being paid for are the services and facilities that enabl
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How to stretch your budget at University

It’s now just a matter of weeks before 500,00+ students head off to university for the first time. And while there’s the prospect of learning, new friends, activities and adventures, the nightmare of debt, tuition fees and running out of cash also looms large for many. This year, tuition fees are rising to £9,250 at most UK universities. Rents are higher than they have ever been and we’re all feeling the pinch from post-Brexit price rises. So, if you’re a new student or one heading back to university in October 2017 how do you win at your finances without winning the lottery first? Make the most of the money that you have Money might be tight but there are ways that you can make it go further. Learn how to budget. According to research by Leeds Beckett University around 20% of students arrive at university worried about how to manage their finances. Budgeting is the foundation of making the most of the money you’ve got and staying in control. What is coming in, what has to
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Should I go to University or get a job?

The decisions that you make at 18 will probably be among the most momentous of your lifetime. And when you’ve completed your A-levels, the really big decision is whether to go to university or to get a job. There’s nothing new in this debate – school leavers have been talking about it for generations. But changes to the way that university tuition is funded plus huge shifts in Britain’s occupational patterns mean that the answer is nowhere near as straightforward as it used to be. The benefits of higher education Carrying on with study once you reach 18 has never been more popular with more than 415,000 students accepted onto degree courses by Britain’s universities and colleges last year. Holding a degree continues to offer the prospect of higher rates of pay than for those who never go to university. Figures from jobs website Adzuna, which analysed more than 1,000,000 vacancies in 2015, found that those with a degree looking for work were likely to earn up to £12,000 a ye
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Should I buy or rent a house?

You may have just graduated from university or got your first job. Or you may simply have been living at home for longer than you had originally planned and are keen to put down roots in a place that you can call your own. Moving out into your first house is the first major step of adulthood. But millions of young Britons are finding it harder and harder to take that step because of rising prices, stagnating wages and the ongoing shortage in the country’s housing stock. For the majority of people under the age of 25, renting has traditionally been the first step to independence. Letting a house from a landlord means that you can move out of home without having to worry about the responsibilities that come with actually owning your own house. But hundreds of thousands of first-time buyers continue to climb onto the property ladder each year thanks to record low interest rates and the allure of starting to make an investment in bricks and mortar. So, if you are thinking of moving out
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Costs vs Benefits of a University education – An Infographic

The last 20 years have seen a significant change to the funding of British higher education. Rather than the State covering the cost the burden has been passed to the university student. The cost being covered by students has risen significantly. By the end of a typical 3 year course it is perfectly possible for a graduate to be in debt to the tune of £50,000 or more. Any student now considering doing a degree needs to be sure that the financial benefits over their lifetime will still outweigh the costs. There are obviously a series of non-financial benefits that also accrue by studying at a further education level but it is really down to the student to decide which of these, if any, they value. University Infographic Our infographic is designed to show: What the costs are of going to university How weekly costs differ around the country including living costs and the cost of having a social life What the financial and non-financial benefits are of gaining a degree. With the student
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Costs vs. Benefits of a University education – An Infographic

The last 20 years have seen a significant change to the funding of British higher education. Rather than the State covering the cost the burden has been passed to the university student. The cost being covered by students has risen significantly. By the end of a typical 3 year course it is perfectly possible for a graduate to be in debt to the tune of £50,000 or more. Any student now considering doing a degree needs to be sure that the financial benefits over their lifetime will still outweigh the costs. There are obviously a series of non-financial benefits that also accrue by studying at a further education level but it is really down to the student to decide which of these, if any, they value. University Infographic Our infographic is designed to show: What the costs are of going to university How weekly costs differ around the country including living costs and the cost of having a social life What the financial and non-financial benefits are of gaining a degree. With the student
http://bit.ly/2ac65r8