How to live the Good Life in 2017

The Good Life – being entirely self sufficient – has been a dream for decades. But whether you’re pursuing Tom and Barbara’s 70s hippy vision or something altogether more millennial where do you start when it comes to growing your own and turning green fingers into a great life? Back garden or allotment? If you’re lucky enough to have a fairly sizeable back garden then you’re off to a great start. If you don’t then there’s always an allotment. The idea of an allotment is that you’re allocated a patch of land that you can use to grow. Applications for allotments are made through the local council (search your local council website for details) and availability varies wildly from city to city. Most plots usually come in at between 100 and 300 square metres and will be located with other allotments managed by other local residents. The cost of renting an allotment is low – around £10 per year outside of London. The only complication with allotments is that, in areas
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Why decluttering your life is good for you

You might think that decluttering is simply tidying up. However, a whole way of thinking has developed behind ideas of decluttering that extends from your physical space, to your mental wellbeing. If 2017 is the year in which you want to see changes to old habits, bad relationships and lacklustre progress, decluttering could be your ticket there. What is decluttering and how can it help? The definition of declutter comes in two parts. The first is “to remove unnecessary items” and the second, “from an untidy or overcrowded space.” So, the central ideas behind decluttering are basically to get rid of what you no longer need to make life less crowded. This has obvious relevance to physical spaces but can go much further than that too. So, what areas of your life can you declutter and what benefits can you expect to see as a result? Your home There are many reasons why a decluttered home might be good for you. From basic hygiene and making spaces easier to clean and access, to ma
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The art of “good” borrowing

By: Oliver Jones Feb 29, 2016 The art of “good” borrowing Debt is something that most of us have become accustomed to, but how do you stay in control of it – how do you borrow “well”?. While borrowing – loans, payday loans, credit cards etc – beyond your means is never a good idea, using debt to help take advantage of life’s opportunities can be really useful. Good debt vs. bad debt Essentially, the art of good borrowing is based on the distinction between good debt and bad debt. Good debt is the kind that is an investment in your financial future – this will leave you better off in the long term, allow you to deal with a short-term issue or shortfall, and there will be a specific reason as to why you want to use the debt in the first place. Most importantly, good debt is not going to have a negative overall impact on your finances in the long term or leave you in a financial hole that you are unable to get out of. Planning is key Borrowing money is a great way to do many things
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Can debt ever be a good thing?

By: Alex Hartley Nov 19, 2015 Can debt ever be a good thing? There is no doubt that debt that is badly managed can be problematic for everyone and it’s important to make sure that the level of debt that you have doesn’t overwhelm you. However, the purpose of debt is not to get individuals into a sticky spot but out of it. It should be about achieving your dreams earlier than you might otherwise be able to if you had to save up first. There are many different types of debt in modern society and most of it is designed to be constructive and to help you move your life on another step – if responsibly managed it can do just that. But what kinds of debt are there and how might these help? Mortgages The most common type of debt by far in the UK, a mortgage is essentially a long-term loan. At its simplest, a mortgage is supplied by a lender in order to enable the borrower to buy a property – without a mortgage most people wouldn’t be able to afford to get on the property ladder unl
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