How to buy a used car using car finance

The UK market for used cars is thriving. According to the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders, 2016 was a bumper year for the used car industry and set a record for sales. 8.2 million used cars were sold last year, which represents a 7.3% increase on the year before. So, the market is booming – and for many people the simplest and fastest way to secure the right second hand car is with car finance. But what are the options if you’re looking for used car finance and are there any risks in doing so? Used car finance – the market If you’re looking for a cost effective car purchase then the chances are you have considered a second hand vehicle. The market for used cars is very different today to 20 years ago. Back then, if you were looking for a used car, then you were most likely going to be buying from an individual or a dealership handling genuinely second hand cars that had seen relatively intense road usage. Today, it’s a different story. When it comes to buying bran
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Is it finally time to buy an electric car and join the party?

There used to be a time when an electric car was a serious novelty. The idea of being able to plug in a car and charge it up like a mobile phone was a bit of a conceptual leap for some. Today, however, that’s no longer the case. By the end of June 2017 new registrations for plug in cars had reached 105,000 – up from just 3,500 in 2013. Many major manufacturers now offer electric vehicles as part of their range and more and more drivers are switching on to the benefits of leaving petrol behind. So, is now the time to buy an electric car? The cost of buying an electric car In the early days the cost of manufacturing electric vehicles meant that the sale price was pretty high. Motorists would pay a premium to buy but then make savings later, such as the cost of fuel and avoiding the Congestion Charge in London. Now, however, electric car costs are dropping fast. A 2017 forecast by the investment bank UBS predicted that electric cars would soon be on a level, price-wise, with your sta
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Rules of Council House Right to Buy

Last year, the Government introduced a new Right to Buy housing scheme which allows council tenants to benefit from a new £77,900 discount on the market price if they want to buy their council home. The figure is £103,900 for tenants who live in London. Who has the Right to Buy? Only those who have been a tenant in the public sector for at least the last three years qualify for Right to Buy. So, the scheme is only open to people who live in a property owned by a local council, an NHS trust or a local housing association. But you don’t have to have lived continuously in the house for a period of three years – it can have been in other public sector homes – and it doesn’t have to be in the home that you want to purchase. However, the home must be your sole property and it must be self-contained. These are the main exclusions from the scheme: Where the house or flat is not your main home If you share a part of it with other tenants – for example, a common kitchen or bathroom
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Borrow what you need – don’t buy it!

Anyone with an older sibling knows the benefits of The Borrow . Rather than paying for something yourself, simply borrow from an older brother or sister and then return it before they notice. In the adult world, this principle is getting a new airing thanks to a wave of technology designed to help you get what you want without paying full price. The range of borrow-able items is broad, whether you’re looking for a bouncy castle for a kid’s party or a pair of shoes for a wedding. And of course it works the other way around too – you can be the lender or the borrower. In the modern world, many consumers have two major issues. Firstly, we probably don’t have the money to buy everything we want. And secondly, most of us have got a houseful of items that we don’t really use that much. It might be the skirts bought in the sale that just never looked good. Or perhaps a fantastic electric drill that comes out once every couple of years (statistically, a household drill only gets 12
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The new online ways to buy or sell your cars

The internet is a fantastic marketplace you can buy and sell everything online now, from houses, to suitcases. Those selling online are often able to offer lower prices than the costs of products in bricks and mortar stores. Plus, the internet has connected individuals who are looking to sell to each other, cutting out the middleman. Cars are perhaps one of the most expensive purchases that we make. If you’re looking to reduce your up front purchase costs – or get a good price for an old vehicle – selling or buying online offers a great, simple option. What are the choices? There are lots different choices when it comes to selling or buying a car online now but most of them come down to the same structure. Normally, a website or app serves as a database, either distributing your car details to dealers or showing you the buying options available. These are four of the most popular: Carwow – this site works on the basis of comparison. Find the car you want to buy and you’ll be
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The best way to buy and finance a car in 2017

If your car is old, always breaking down or simply becoming a bit of an embarrassment, you’re probably thinking about replacing it. But buying a new or used car can seem like a daunting prospect: do you ask the bank for a loan, go with one of the finance companies’ options or sign up to a lease deal? What will cost you the least money each month, saving your budget for all your other expenses, or are you more concerned about what the deal will cost you in total over the long term? New car or preloved car? While buying a spanking new motor might seem like the best option – lower running costs, fewer breakdowns and the cachet of driving the latest model – it’s worth remembering that the average new car will lose almost 50 per cent of its sale value over the first three years that you drive it. That’s just the average depreciation; many cars lose their value much faster than that with makes like Peugeot, Citroen and Fiat losing up to two thirds of their value over those three
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Is High Street Rent to Buy a sensible financial choice?

You know the stomach churning feeling when the usually reliable washing machine breaks down. Suddenly your weekly routine is shot to pieces. How are you going to get today’s laundry done? What about tomorrow’s? Where’s the nearest launderette? How are you going to catch up with the backlog? It’s a nightmare that we’re all been through at one time or another. And if your machine, or any other appliance or gadget for that matter, has got to the point where repairs just no longer make economic sense then maybe it’s time to replace it. If your budget is tight and your savings are low or non-existent then you’ll need to get your replacement on credit. But how to do it? The rise of High Street Rent to Buy Buying household items on credit is very common. Historically that might have meant your local Curry’s store or DFS. Here you would negotiate the price and also the terms of credit over say a 12 month period. You’d take ownership and make monthly repayments. But repaying
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